Upgrade results, bonus for dragonflybsd.org

Remember the upgrade for dragonflybsd.org machines?  It completed, and it’s interesting to see that SSDs have become so easily available that “spinning rust” hard disk drives are only still useful for bulk storage, and even then probably not for much longer.

Another neat side effect: disk usage on developer system leaf.dragonflybsd.org  was cut in half, thanks to HAMMER2 dedup/compression.  It’s a ‘free’ half-terabyte.

Lazy Reading for 2018/07/15

Oddball things week, this week.

In Other BSDs for 2018/07/14

Some overflow, and thank goodness cause I don’t have a day without work this week.

Lazy Reading for 2018/07/08

50% history, 50% new things that I love about the Internet.

In Other BSDs for 2018/07/07

Lots of NetBSD links this week relative to usual.

Update: how did I miss this?  PkgSrcCon 2018 is happening now in Berlin, and there’s a livestream.  (via)

Some package statistics

The article I linked yesterday about Ravenports got me wondering about what package are most popular.  avalon.dragonflybsd.org is the default binary package archive for pkg, and it has httpd logs back to 2013, so I collated some information.

I read out a list of packages, and weighed them according to how recently they were downloaded.  I also mushed together all the py/ruby/p5/php numbered packages, and excluded lib*.

After all that… there’s a lot of noise.  One install of any desktop environment pulls in hundreds of packages automatically, so it’s hard to tell what’s installed by a human and what’s installed by dependency.  That being said, here’s some highlights.  This is me applying an arbitrary value and then arbitrarily snipping out a list… but it’s fun to see if nothing else.

18596 python27
13564 xorg-server
13499 perl5
13391 xterm
12098 xorg
8512 cups
8453 bash
8389 ffmpeg
8367 spidermonkey170
7884 python
7432 firefox
6997 sudo
6896 bind-tools
6702 openldap-client
5651 nano
5529 xfce4-conf
5052 xfce
4663 ruby
4447 vim
3133 tmux
2578 chromium
2248 zsh
2175 samba44
2132 python36
2007 mate-desktop
1765 mysql56-client
1699 fluxbox
1690 vim-lite
1517 CoinMP
1407 openjdk8
1395 samba46
1384 lumina
1367 kde
1355 mpg123
1353 spidermonkey24
1340 vlc
1338 thunderbird
1329 wpa_supplicant
1252 firebird25-client
1164 gimp
1103 zip
1083 youtube_dl
1044 php
941 freerdp
931 mercurial
927 lynx
866 evolution
848 gnome3
845 openjdk
842 openbox
842 epiphany
799 nmap
798 go
796 mutt
796 gnuchess
743 apache24
726 rxvt-unicode
722 irssi
652 firefox-esr
652 htop
649 rust
619 smartmontools
575 fvwm
529 windowmaker
477 openvpn
472 synth
451 fish
406 npm
403 inkscape
402 enlightenment
367 firefox-i18n
351 dwm
347 neovim
341 R
339 emacs25
320 emacs
320 unbound
312 tor
310 lua
300 cinnamon
300 wireshark
282 netcat
272 pidgin
258 postfix
258 joe
252 GraphicsMagick
251 dillo
249 icewm
242 mosh
236 rtorrent
225 weechat
219 audacious
218 smtube
216 calibre
190 xmms
187 pdksh
184 redis
184 openssh-portable
183 tk85
173 rdesktop
172 nedit
164 terminator
161 fetchmail
160 KeePassX
156 dnsmasq

SSH keys and making your life easier

A tip for anyone using public keys in SSH: you can start up your xorg session using ssh-agent and then have all subsequent connections be authorized by the agent, saving you some hassle of password typing, etc.  Put this in your ~/.xinitrc :

eval `/usr/bin/ssh-agent -c`
(insert line to start up your window manager here)
/bin/kill $SSH_AGENT_PID

(Yoinked from Matthew Dillon on IRC)  Realistically, you should also lock your terminal or otherwise prevent physical access to any workstation where you do this, since it means immediate SSH access to other systems using your identity, for anyone touching that keyboard.

If you’re using Windows, there’s always Pageant.

Lazy Reading for 2018/07/01

Historic games is this week’s accidental theme.