Remember: don’t kldload i915 too soon

I just wasted an hour trying to figure out why xorg had strange output but no errors on this laptop, and it’s because I had i915_load=”YES” in /boot/loader.conf instead of i915_load=”YES” in /etc/rc.conf.  I’m almost nearly sure I’ve mentioned that before, but if not: here you go.

(though if you never plan to run X, you can put it in loader.conf and everything will just work.)

(Title updated for a more correct sentence)

Booting, UEFI, and text consoles

I installed a DragonFly snapshot on a Lenovo x220 last night.  I went for a EFI install, even though the x220 has a “Legacy” option.  When I booted, it looked like this:

It successfully booted, but once it hit the kernel load, it started printing to the top of the screen in that lovely repeating pattern you see.

Matthew Dillon helpfully pointed out that the DRM and i915 modules needed to be loaded.  Hitting ‘9’ during the bootloader countdown got me to a prompt where I could type:

drm_load="YES"

i915_load="YES"'

kern.kms_console=1

menu

Which brought me back to the boot menu, but this time it loaded those additional modules to support the Intel video chipset – and it worked!

These lines can go in /boot/loader.conf for permanent use.

Update: accelerated X will need a different setup – see my later post.

Kabylake NUC and DragonFly

Matthew Dillon’s been using a Kabylake NUC for a DragonFly workstation and it’s generally working out well.  It’s tiny enough to lose on a desk, in my opinion.  He added performance details and a screenshot.  The Specific Configs page has his notes, recorded, too.

Related laptop tip: If you have a Lenovo Yoga and can’t mount the drive after install, various sdhci modules may be the answer.  Update: definitely the answer.

 

 

New mechanism: kcollect

There’s a new facility in DragonFly: kcollect(8).  It holds automatically-collected kernel data for about the last day, and can output to gnuplot.  Note the automatic collection part; your system will always be able to tell you about weirdness – assuming that weirdness extends to one of the features kcollect tracks.  Here’s some of the commits.

Lazy Reading for 2017/07/23

I’ve got some esoteric stuff this week.

Unrelated audio link of the week: Alan Lomax recordings are up on Bandcamp.

Lazy Reading for 2017/06/04

A lot of this was picked up during the previous long U.S. holiday weekend.

Lazy Reading for 2017/03/05

A little meta, this week.

Your unrelated tea link of the week: In Sri Lanka’s Tea Paradise, A Social Enterprise Is Brewing.  I actually heard about the quality of the tea (very good) before I heard about the way the company was formed.  Consider where your next tea purchase comes from, in light of this.

DIY RSS feed reads

Here’s one of the reasons to have your own permanent server: The New York Times has a daily feature called, not surprisingly, “The Daily“.  It’s a short 15-20 minute news segment, ready by 6 AM.  It’s available through Google Play Music or iTunes, but I leave for work by 6:15, and I don’t want to use up cell data downloading something that should arrive on my phone just before I leave the house.  Of course, there’s no obvious way to tell Google Play, “I know it’s there; go get it right now”.  I don’t know the iPhone experience, but I imagine it’s the same.  I want to download on my time, not on Google or Apple’s schedule.

Luckily, there’s an RSS feed for this podcast.  That, plus this simple script on my DragonFly system, means I can pull it down whenever I’m ready:

fetch -o – http://feeds.podtrac.com/zKq6WZZLTlbM | grep enclosure | cut -d ‘”‘ -f2 | xargs fetch -m

So, it’s a matter of running that script, and syncing off my own local storage, on my own schedule.  FolderSync Lite will happily sync back to my phone using sftp.