Lazy Reading for 2014/01/26

Finally, a relatively quiet week.

Writing more efficient shell scripts.

.  Piped shell commands seen as a set of relations.  This is the most analysis I’ve ever seen of a command line.  (via)  Also related.

Perl Secret Operators.  (via)

As a followup on last week’s Curse of the Leading Zero link, Thomas Klausner points out Python 3.0 explicitly stopped reading leading zeros as the prefix for octals.

The current Humble Weekly Sale (through the 31st) is all roguelikes.  Dunno how many of them run on non-Windows. though.

Mastering Vim in Vim.  Lots more ‘learning Vim’ suggestions where I found this link.

Not possible to have happen; I don’t believe it.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: 50 years of tape.  Cassette audio tapes, that is.  (via)

In Other BSDs for 2014/01/25

Back to relatively normal volume, this week.

Go testing for DragonFly

Brad Fitzpatrick showed up on the users@ list and mentioned that for DragonFly to be supported in Go, it needed to show up in the Go Dashboard with building reports.  I now have the Go builder running on pkgbox32/  Check the builder page to see status.

Note: Installing the port of Go from Dports works just fine; this is the mechanism for testing Go on a per-commit basis for the people who work on Go – so a ‘fail’ notice on the builder page doesn’t necessarily mean anything, unless you are developing Go itself.  This may already be clear to you.

Lazy Reading for 2014/01/19

The Internet overfloweth with good links, lately.  Nothing this week that requires a lot of reading, but plenty of things to click.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week:  Fail Forward, a collection of writing about pen and paper RPGs.  (via)

Convention addendum

I’ve got a buildup of convention dates to mention, so I’ll do it now: John Marino, one of the folks behind dports, is talking about Ada and BSD at FOSDEM, in Brussels, February 1-2.   George Neville-Neil is talking about BSD to NYLUG in of course New York City, on I think February 13th.  Ike Levy will be talking to the Tokyo FreeBSD Benkyokai Group, on February 17th, about pfSense.  And of course, NYCBSDCon is happening February 8th, and I think I’ll be there.

In Other BSDs for 2014/01/18

I didn’t even need to find source links this week.

The cheapest possible DragonFly

With everyone buying tablets lately, the low end of computers is getting pretty low-cost indeed.  Creating single-purpose computers is possible, and I was thinking of doing that to create a Go-testing system.  (Though probably not necessary for me.)  It got me to thinking, though…

How low-cost a system could run DragonFly?  The master-slave and low system requirements of Hammer lead to some interesting possibilities.  There’s no Arduino equivalent for DragonFly because there’s no DragonFly on ARM, despite all my wishing.  DragonFly has been run on Soekris systems before, and might work on a PCEngines ALIX board.  Ebay, my basement, or Craigslist are options too, but not as fun.  Who has suggestions?