Category: Google Summer of Code

Summer of Code: midterm passes


All 6 Google Summer of Code projects for DragonFly have reached the midterm, and passed!

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Vkernel checkpoint status


Irina Pre?a has posted a nice summary of the Google Summer of Code project “Checkpointing vkernels.”

Summer of Code midterms due


If you are a Summer of Code student or mentor, make sure you’ve filled out your midterm survey.  Without it, your project fails – and they are due for everyone in roughly the next 24 hours!

Summer of Code Doc Camp


One of the perpetual questions about Summer of Code is “Why can’t there be documentation projects?”, since most open source projects need docs as badly as code.  There’s various reasons that I’m too lazy to research and type out, I’m sure, but Google is sponsoring a “Doc Camp“, in October.  You don’t have to be in Summer of Code; you just have to be willing to spend the 17th through the 25th writing documentation.  Google pays for room and board, and you can apply for transportation cost coverage.  A classy idea, all around.  Someone participate and report back!

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Summer of Code halfway point


The Google Summer of Code midterms are coming up, which generally means students get graded on a pass/fail basis for their work so far, and both mentors and students fill out surveys.  What’s this mean?  It means we’re halfway through six projects!

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GSoC: virtio status


There’s an update on Stéphanie Ouillon’s Google Summer of Code project, working on the virtio block device driver.

Virtio block driver progress


Stéphanie Ouillon has posted extensive details on the Virtio Google Summer of Code project; a few questions are included for anyone who wants to jump in and offer feedback.

Other Summer of Code: pkgsrc


One of the Google Summer of Code projects that will be valuable for DragonFly even though it isn’t a DragonFly project: “Add other package formats to pkgsrc”, where pkgsrc can interpret rpm, dpkg, and FreeBSD Ports files.  Anyway, the project has a Sourceforge site.

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Device Mapper mirror page


Adam Hoka, a student in Google Summer of Code for DragonFly, has created a wiki page for his device mapper mirroring project.  Not a lot there, but I’m happy to see the reference.

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GSoC: kernel file descriptor event subsystem


And here’s one last writeup/introduction for Google Summer of Code projects on DragonFly: kevent part 2.  (Apparently school exams prevented this from being written sooner.)

Summer of Code work that isn’t Summer of Code


Kedar Soparkar applied for Google Summer of Code with DragonFly, but didn’t make the cut with the very few slots we have.  So, he’s going to work on his i386 ABI implementation anyway.   More student work is always wonderful news.

GSoC: checkpointing vkernels and PUFFS


Two more of the DragonFly and Google Summer of Code projects: Irina Presa’s checkpointing vkernels, where you can save a running virtual kernel and start it again later, and Nick Prokharau’s port of PUFFS.

(Anyone know the HTML character code for ‘s’ with an inverted grave mark so I can spell Irina’s name correctly?)

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GSoC: dsched BFQ, virtio, LVM mirror


Yay acronyms! Brills Peng was accepted for the Summer of Code project “Improve dsched interfaces and implement BFQ disk scheduling policy” – and now there’s a nice writeup describing what’s planned. Also, Stéphanie Ouillon did the same thing for the virtio drivers project.  Adam Hoka also joined in with a summary for his LVM mirror project.  Please keep this up, students.

Summer of Code DragonFly projects announced


Google’s announced the accepted projects for 2011.  DragonFly has 6 slots!

We had a large number of interesting project proposals; far more than than the slots available.  If you’re one of the students who did not get in, please consider working on your project as time allows.  I know it won’t be lucrative, but I’d still like to see them happen.

Here’s the list of accepted projects:

  1. Implementing a mirror target for device mapper: Adam Hoka, mentored by Joe Talbott
  2. Improve dsched interfaces and implement BFQ disk scheduling policy: Brills Peng, mentored by Alex Hornung
  3. Make vkernels checkpointable: Irina Presa, mentored by Venkatesh Srinivas
  4. Port PUFFS from NetBSD/FreeBSD: nickprok, mentored by Nathaniel Filardo
  5. Bring kernel event notification in DragonFly BSD to its logical conclusion: Samuel J. Greear, mentored by Sascha Wildner
  6. Porting Virtio Drivers from NetBSD to DragonFly BSD to speed up DragonFly BSD as a KVM guest: Stéphanie Ouillon, mentored by Pratyush Kshirsagar

 

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Monday the 25th: 2.10 release, GSoC projects


This upcoming Monday should be exciting!  It’s the planned date for the release of DragonFly 2.10.  Also, the accepted projects for Google Summer of Code (including for DragonFly) will be announced.

Thoughts about RAID1


There’s been plenty of discussion about Summer of Code projects on the mailing lists.  One conversation about “Implementing a mirror target for the device mapper” led to a longer description from Venkatesh Srinivas about mirroring and how he’s looked at implementation.

Some Summer of Code projects


If you’d like to read some of the Summer of Code student proposals for DragonFly, there’s a number of them available.  I haven’t found a way to get a comprehensive list without being logged in, yet.

Student applications open for Summer of Code


Summer of Code 2011 student applications can be made now.  If you’re a student, you’ve got until April 8th to get it done!  (Calendar)  Remember, you can’t be too organized, too early.

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DragonFly/Gentoo


I had linked to this before during Summer of Code 2010 before it completed, but an ongoing discussion on the kernel@ mailing list for DragonFly reminded me: a student named Naohiro Aota put together a Gentoo/DragonFly system for SoC 2010, similar to the existing Gentoo/FreeBSD project.  He’s interested in working directly with DragonFly, now.

GSoC: mentors please sign up


The mentor signup page for Google Summer of Code 2011 is available again, launched using a new interface.  If you want to be a mentor, please sign up now.  The student application period opens tomorrow!

Summer of Code: mentoring wait


The mentor signup page for Google Summer of Code 2011 as of this writing still says “We have temporarily disabled the creation of new requests and invites in preparation of the launch of the new UI for Melange later this week.”, as it has said since the 20th.

So, if you’re wanting to mentor, keep an eye on it.  I’ll send mentor requests to any of the names on my list of people that have already expressed interest, if I get to a working version of the page before you do…

Summer of Code student application


For the curious, or for those who plan ahead, I posted what’s on the Google Summer of Code student application for DragonFly.

Getting started on a Summer of Code project


If you were thinking of working on a disk scheduler for DragonFly, this is your lucky day!  Brills Peng asked for some overall guidance on how to start on a Summer of Code project.  I threw out some general tips, Alex Hornung talked up resources on kernel programming, and Venkatesh Srinivas described exactly what you’d need to write a disk scheduler.  There’s about 50% of a whole proposal, prewritten.

Summer of Code 2011: We’re in!


We made it into Google Summer of Code for a 4th year!  (yay!)

http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/org/show/google/gsoc2011/dragonflybsd

If you want to mentor, apply here:

http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/mentor/request/google/gsoc2011/dragonflybsd

(You will need to create a login if you don’t have one.)  I’m assuming the applicants are going to be people I know with a direct history with DragonFly; otherwise be prepared to give a good history.  Signing up to mentor does not mean you must mentor if there aren’t any projects that interest you; it does mean you need to review applications and provide feedback for students March 28th – April 8th.

If you want to be a student with DragonFly:

Check the projects page for ideas:
http://www.dragonflybsd.org/docs/developer/gsocprojectspage/

… or come up with your own.

Get your application together by March 28th.  Start talking about it on the mailing list or IRC or however as soon as you can; there’s a direct relationship between the amount of preparation we see beforehand and people getting accepted.

Here’s the timeline:

http://www.google-melange.com/document/show/gsoc_program/google/gsoc2011/timeline

Copied from my email to users@/kernel@, cause it has everything you need.

 

 

Backup Summer of Code ideas page


dragonflybsd.org is down right now, so if you’re looking for the Google Summer of Code ideas page for DragonFly, I have a local mirror of that page.

Update: dragonflybsd.org is back up, but I’ll keep that mirror there just in case…

Summer of Code application in


I forgot to mention it when I did this opening night, but: DragonFly’s application to Google Summer of Code 2011 is in.  We find out if we’re accepted on the 18th.

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Anatomy of a Summer of Code proposal


“Arjun S R” wrote to the kernel@ mailing list asking about the Google Summer of Code projects for DragonFly that he found interesting.  Samuel Greear has a response so detailed it includes links to a similar project proposed last year.  It also works as a good model for how much thought needs to go in before you start.

Update: there’s more, plus some pertinent advice!

Summer of Code ideas page, expanded


I’ve linked to it before, but it’s expanded since: the Google Summer of Code projects page on dragonflybsd.org has a whole lot of ideas listed.  Please add to it, especially if there’s a project you’d like to be doing.  (Here’s more thoughts, for example.)

virtio drivers and GSoC 2011


Stéphanie Ouillon expressed interest in the virtio drivers as a Google Summer of Code project for DragonFly; Aggelos Economopoulos followed up with an explanation of the various work that’s been done, and further resources.  I chimed in with my usual warning.

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GSoC 2011: want to mentor?


If you’re interested in mentoring for DragonFly and Google Summer of Code for 2011, please speak up.  You don’t have to mentor if you don’t see any projects you like – I just need an initial count for the application. If you don’t want to mentor at all, but you’ve got ideas: there’s a place to tell people about it.

Google Summer of Code 2011 announced


Google Summer of Code is happening again!  (FAQ, timeline)  Of course, DragonFly will be applying to participate as a mentoring organization again this year.  The last several years have all been fruitful with completed projects and new developers, so it’s worth the effort.

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November OSBR: Economic Development


The November issue of the Open Source Business Resource is out, with the theme of “Economic Development.”  I like the microcredit article, but perhaps that’s just my special interest.

The December issue’s theme is “Humanitarian Open Source” and the guest editor will be Leslie Hawthorn.  She’s currently Open Source Outreach Manager at Oregon State University Open Source Lab, but some may remember her as the face of Google Summer of Code for the past several years.

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Google Code-In project notes


I’ve coded some tasks on the DragonFly projects page for Google Code-In.  (Application is in already.)  If there’s any additional DragonFly projects appropriate for 13 to 18-year old students, that’s the place to add it.  The application period ends the 29th at 23:00 UTC, so don’t take your time.

KMS and GEM work, for cash


There’s still no support for KMS/GEM on any most BSDs, though there are people interested in it for FreeBSD.  One of DragonFly’s Summer of Code projects was just that, though it’s not in a state where it can be really used.

Google Code-In: maybe


I’ve applied on behalf of DragonFly for Google Code-In.  It’s similar to Google Summer of Code, but focuses on 13-18-year-olds and smaller tasks.  It runs over the year-end, and we’ll know if we’re in by November 5th.

In the meantime, if you have ideas that could fit the program (see task list at the Google site), please put them on the DragonFly project page.

Google Summer of Code 2010: everybody wins!


All three of the Google Summer of Code Projects for DragonFly are complete and passed!  The code for each will show up at the Google-hosted project page in the next week or so.  The original proposals for Alex Hornung’s device mapper/LVM, Samuel Greear’s kevent/select/pool work, and David Shao’s GEM/KMS porting are still there on the Google project page for DragonFly.

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Selective wakeups, with numbers


Samuel J. Greear posted a note about his Summer of Code work, focusing on selective wakeup.  He outlined his strategy, and then posted benchmark numbers  – using Apache, lighthttpd, and a minimal web server he wrote just to show the improvements from selective wakeup.

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Another GSoC update


David Shao has updated his GSoC project page on the DragonFly website.  His project is updating DRM/GEM/KMS for BSD systems.  It’s a huge but important piece of work.  This update brings news on updates to locking systems and data structures.

New kevent for testing


Samuel J. Greear’s work on his Google Summer of Code project, unifying the select/poll/kevent subsystem into kevent, is already available for testing.  Any testing – just booting, or running X, or other simple tasks – is useful, as this new system touches many things.

SoC kqueue progress


Samuel Greear has a whole page about his Google Summer of Code kqueue project, recently updated.

GEM and KMS progress for GSoC


Yay, acronyms!  GSoC student David Shao has an extensive page up describing the state of his work so far.

Another Summer of Code project


From a commenter on a previous post: Gentoo has a Google Summer of Code project porting portage to DragonFly, by student Naohiro Aota.  I had no idea this was happening – this is interesting!

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Summer of Code projects final


We’ve got 3 projects for Google Summer of Code 2010:

  • “Device Mapper based Logical Volume Management”, by Alexander Hornung and mentored by Chuck Tuffli.
  • “Porting kernel mode-setting, GEM and KMS, to DragonFlyBSD” by David Shao, mentored by Matthew Dillon
  • “Coalesce + MPSAFE kevent, select, poll and wakeup” by Samuel Greear, mentored by Joe Talbott

We had a good number of excellent proposals, but only 3 slots from Google.  There were only 12 spare slots by the end of the proposal period, too, meaning less than 1 spare per 10 organizations.  I’d encourage people that applied and didn’t get in to still try the work; there were some neat proposals!

Visit the GSoC site for more details.

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Summer of Code applications in


We’ve got 28 applications for Summer of Code, approximately what we had last year.  If you’re a student, hold tight.  We’ve got until the 21st to get everyone matched up, student <-> mentor.

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72 hours left to apply for Summer of Code


If you’re a potential Summer of Code student, there’s about 72 hours left in the student application period.  Get it in there!

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Summer of Code 2010: DragonFly BSD


We’ve got a third year in Summer of Code!

The timeline shows about a week and a half for planning, and then student applications begin on the 29th of March, and run to April 9th.

If you want to participate as a student, start planning now by talking with people on IRC (#dragonflybsd on EFNet) or on the mailing lists.  You cannot be over-prepared.

Summer of Code organization application details


I’ve applied for DragonFly for the 2010 Summer of Code program.  I posted the details of the application, for the curious.  The application period closes in the next 24 hours; hopefully we’ll be in again…

Mentoring reminder


We have several potential Summer of Code mentors already, but if you want to get in on the action, let me know.  Org applications start Monday, and I’d like a count before then…

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Summer of Code mentors wanted


(reproduced from my email to users@/kernel@)

The application period for Google Summer of Code 2010 starts in about a
week. We were able to enter in 2008 and 2009, so I’m optimistic that we
will get in for 2010 too.

Saying “I’m willing to mentor” doesn’t force you to commit yet; you don’t
have to work with a student on a project you don’t find interesting.
However, mentoring is a multi-week commitment to support a student who may
or may not have the best planning skills – please be ready to help.

I need to know soon how many potential mentors we have since we have to
ask for a given number of slots from Google as part of the application
process.  If you are interested in mentoring, speak up here or by email, please. If
there’s a particular project on the GSoC 2010 page that looks interesting,
put your name by it.

http://www.dragonflybsd.org/docs/developer/gsoc2010/

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More GSoC ideas available for DragonFly


The Google Summer of Code ideas page for DragonFly is growing faster than I expected.  If you have an idea (or, even better, want to take on a project assuming we make it into SoC), take a look.

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Google Summer of Code presentation templates


If you need to talk about/sell the Google Summer of Code idea to people, Google now has a set of templates for GSOC presentations.  Use them to drum up interest, or persuade someone to mentor/be a student.

Summer of Code FAQ, calendar, more


Google’s posted a FAQ for Summer of Code in 2010, which includes a timeline.  There’s also a 2010 calendar, which is perhaps most useful in “Agenda” view.  Keep those dates in mind if you are planning to participate.  If you feel like doing some promotion, there’s a section with flyers in multiple languages.

Also, the GSOC 2010 logo.  Logo’s pretty, but typographically, it’s brutal.  More importantly, the student stipend has increased to USD $5,000 for 2010.

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A week’s worth of posts for you


I can’t keep up with all the things to post.  I desperately want to clear my inbox, so here’s a week’s worth of posts all smushed together.  Enjoy!

Phew.

Google Summer of Code 2010: it’s on


Google Summer of Code for 2010 is accepting applications from mentor organizations starting March 8th.  Pending acceptance by Google, DragonFly will participate.

If you’ve got ideas, or if you want to mentor (or both!), enter something on the GSOC 2010 page on the DragonFly website.

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Summer of Code conference


Matthew Dillon went to the Google Summer of Code Mentor’s Conference at Google’s offices in California, and took some pictures.  It’s all available on Flickr.  He was the only DragonFly attendee, but check to see what developers on other open-source projects look like in person.  There’s even the not-related-to-me Joel Sherrill (on the left).

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Test framework details


Stathis Kamperis has written up a description of the test framework he designed during the Summer of Code.  It may end up in DragonFly, which seems like a good idea to me.  It’s designed to be generally operating-system independent.  He includes a link to the git repo where he’s keeping it now.

POSIX message queue soon


Stathis Kamperis, as part of his Summer of Code work, ported NetBSD’s POSIX message queues to DragonFly.  He has a writeup of all the details, and even has test cases!  It should be showing up in 2.5 soon.

Newest committer: Jordan Gordeev


DragonFly’s newest committer is Jordan Gordeev, whose name may already be familiar.  He’s the student behind the 2008/2009 Summer of Code projects for AMD64 support in DragonFly.  You’ll notice the 2.4 release has a 64-bit version, in no small part due to his effort.  Welcome Jordan!

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More bullets


I’ve got a number of little items, so more roundup:

  • How much disruption happened in DragonFly after introducing a dynamic device system?  Surprisingly, very little, as most of pkgsrc still builds.  Thanks are due to Hasso Tepper for the corrective work.
  • _why makes some very perceptive comments.
  • Jordan Gordeev’s been working on the very difficult AMD64 port as part of his Summer of Code work.  He says thanks for the help, and others reply in kind.  Speaking of which, it’s possible to boot 64-bit DragonFly now, though it’s not production-ready.
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DevFS this weekend


The DevFS Summer of Code project is going into DragonFly this weekend; be ready for surprises if you update.  It’s not complete yet; there’s a few more weeks for Summer of Code, but there’s other work that this code will enable.

Summer of Code stats


Google has published some inital statistics from the 2009 midterms.  This covers all Summer of Code projects, not just DragonFly.

Remember, projects are due August 17th at the very latest.

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Summer of Code midterms


The short summary: everyone passed.  Yay!

5 weeks to finish!

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AMD64 progress update


The in-progress code for the Summer of Code project ‘DragonFly on AMD64′ has been imported; you can now build for SMP on AMD64, and complete a installworld/buildworld, natively.  Modules don’t (yet) compile…

Suggestions for devfs


Alex Hornung is looking for suggestions on the userland tool(s) for his devfs project.  This is a Google Summer of Code project, and I’m a bit late posting this, so hurry if you want to get your two cents in.

GSoC: surveys due


If you’re a student or mentor for Google Summer of Code, all midterm surveys have to be done by tomorrow, the 13th, at 12:00 PDT.   Please do it if you haven’t – payment depends on participation.

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GSoC: Midterms!


The Google Summer of Code midterms are almost upon us.  Starting July 6th (that’s next Monday), students and mentors will need to fill out a survey detailing how the project is going.  There’s a preliminary version at Google Docs, so you know what to expect when they go up on the GSoC site.  They will have to be completed by the 13th.

If you’re a student: make sure you have code that shows progress.  If you’re behind schedule, cram.

If you’re a mentor: make sure you are aware of your student’s progress.  If the student’s behind schedule, help them cram.

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SoC: Mentor Summit


Gleaned from the SoC mailing lists: the tenative dates for the 2009 Mentor Summit for the Google Summer of Code program is October 24th and 25th.  Where?  Probably Mountain View, CA.

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GSoC 2009: so far for devfs and AMD64


Alex Hornung posted a summary of how his work on devfs is going, and Jordan Gordeev posted a summary of how much AMD64 is functional.

If you want to try either one (warning: many parts still broken!), use a vkernel for the devfs so a physical system doesn’t get broken.  There’s build instructions for pulling together AMD64 DragonFly.

Update: manual instructions for AMD64, too.

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devfs details


While asking some questions, Alex Hornung let drop some of the details of his Summer of Code devfs project.  Sounds like he’s making good progress.

Looking at licensing


Statis Kamperis is working on POSIX conformance for DragonFly as his Summer of Code project; he’s posted some questions about the agreement he is given for the Open Group’s test suites.  If you’re curious, he links to a copy of the agreement.  (I have an I-am-not-a-lawyer-but-have-worked-on-a-number-of-contracts followup)

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GSOC: AMD64


Another Summer of Code summary: Jordan Gordeev is returning to AMD64 work.  He appears to be ahead of schedule, too.

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GSOC: multi-threaded application debugging


Dan Chis has posted a summary of his Summer of Code project: debugging multi-threaded applications.  He also has some details of his current thesis in there…  He’s busy.

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More GSOC: MP profiling, C99/POSIX conformance


More Summer of Code summaries: Robert Luciani has posted what he plans for his MP contention profiling work, and Stathis Kamperis has a description of his C99/POSIX conformance audit testing, with links.

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DevFS details


Alex Hornung posted a nice summary of his DevFS project for DragonFly Google’s Summer of Code – Matthew Dillon has a followup, too.

Are you a Summer of Code student for DragonFly?  Don’t forget to post a summary of your project to kernel@ before the start.   Yes, I know there’s exams.

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DCBSDCon videos


Murray Stokely very kindly passed me a link to his summary of the 8 videos now online showing presentations from the recent 2009 DCBSDCon.

Of particular interest is Robert Luciani’s talk about M:N threading in DragonFly.  Yes, that’s the same Robert Luciani who is participating in Summer of Code with DragonFly to profile kernel contention on multiprocessor systems.

Summer of Code accepted students


There’s 5 slots for DragonFly in Summer of Code for 2009, and the students in those slots are listed below.  We had some very good applications; more than we had room for and higher quality than last year.  If you did not get in, please consider working independently.

Student: Alexander Hornung
Project: DevFS for DragonFly BSD
Mentor: joe talbott

Student: Dan Chis
Project: Support debugging of multi-threaded applications
Mentor: schubert simon

Student: robert luciani
Project: Profile kernel contention on MP systems
Mentor: Samuel Greear

Student: Jordan Gordeev
Project: Finish amd64 port of DragonFly
Mentor: Matthew Dillon

Student: efstathios kamperis
Project: C99/POSIX Conformance Audit
Mentor: hasso tepper

(announcement here)

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Summer of Code assignments Monday


Student projects for Google Summer of Code will be announced this Monday, for DragonFly, and for all other participating organizations.  DragonFly has 5 slots, and more than 5 excellent proposals, which is a good kind of problem to have.  We’ll see what we can fit.

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A Summer of Code reminder: subscribe


If you’re a student with a Summer of Code application, make sure to subscribe to it. Doing this will ensure you are automatically notified of any mentor requests for more information.

There’s also some recent stats published by Google on the applications so far; DragonFly is one of the surveyed orgs it mentions, and the results are the same – less applications, better quality.

Summer of Code proposals in


The due date for the Summer of Code proposals is past, and DragonFly has 18 proposals.    The consensus from other SoC organizations is the same: less applicants everywhere this year, but the proposal quality is up.

Potential mentors can now discuss the proposals and ask for more detail from the students, until April 15th.

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Student applications due very soon


19:00 UTC today is the deadline for all student applications for Google’s Summer of Code program.  You can revise applications up to April 15th based on feedback, but the initial proposal has to be in the system as of tonight.  That’s 5 hours from now, if I have my time calculations correct.

DragonFly has 15 applications at this point, and general application quality looks to be better this year than last.

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