Privatization means rebuilds

That’s a pretty cryptic headline, isn’t it?  John Marino has ‘privatized’ several libraries in DragonFly, so that they can’t get included involuntarily as part of a port build.  That may mean you will need to perform a full rebuild of your system if you are tracking DragonFly-current.

(This is the way to fix ‘system’ languages like Perl was in FreeBSD 4.x – keep them clearly separate from the port version.  It’s about a decade too late for that idea to work out, though.)

GCC 5 released, switched

DragonFly now has GCC 5.1 release.  If you are running DragonFly master (i.e. 4.1), you’ll probably want to both rebuild world and kernel, and update your packages so they all match.  There’s already packages built with GCC 5.1, so binary package upgrades can happen quickly.  There’s GCC 4.7 packages still available if you aren’t making the jump yet.

If you’re on DragonFly 4.0.x – nothing’s changed.

Changing to gcc 5.0

The default compiler in DragonFly is going to change over from GCC 4.7 to GCC 5.x very soon, to match the GCC 5.1 release.  This means that packages built for DragonFly-master won’t be compatible with the old ones.  You will need to reinstall packages when you next ‘pkg install’.  John Marino has an extensive writeup detailing what’s needed, and the actual change is some days off.

If you are using DragonFly 4.0.x (the release), this doesn’t affect you at all.

V4-mapped addresses out, TCP MTU discovery in

Sepherosa Ziehau has posted a note that V4-mapped addressing is no longer supported in DragonFly.  You will need to do a full buildworld/buildkernel if you are running master.  Also, TCP MTU path discovery is on by default.  Also also, he’s added a SOL_SOCKET/SO_CPUINT socket option for use to reduce load in heavy network activity.  As usual, I don’t quite comprehend.

DragonFly 4.0 released!

The 4.0 release of DragonFly is out!  Quoting from the release page:

Version 4 of DragonFly brings Haswell graphics support, 3D acceleration, and improved performance in extremely high-traffic networks. DragonFly now supports up to 256 CPUs, Haswell graphics (i915), concurrent pf operation, and a variety of other devices.

The more eagle-eyed downloader will notice it’s version 4.0.1, not 4.0.0.  That’s because nobody trusts .0 releases I tagged 4.0.0 just before a few useful commits went in, and it’s better to retag to make sure everyone got them.  See also my message to kernel@/users@

Bash vulnerability; check your dports

There’s a new bash vulnerability that could be a problem for a network-facing machine that happens to use bash.  (See here for test.)  As a BSD user, you can feel somewhat smugly superior since the default shell is tcsh and therefore it may not affect you – unless you’ve installed it from dports.

John Marino has already updated dports.  A new binary is forthcoming, though you can always rebuild by hand if you don’t want to wait.

Update: oh, wait, not done.