Lazy Reading: Clouds, disks, browsers, games

The end of year holidays intruded, so I haven’t had one of these for more than a week.  Sorry!  Merry Christmas, happy new year, etc.

  • Whenever I am tempted to throw family pictures or something similar online in a ‘cloud’ service, I will reread this Jason Scott essay on the ‘Yahoo!locaust’ and come to my senses. (via)
  • There’s a trade-off between size and price for SSDs.  Past a certain point, any drive is generally ‘big enough’, and under a certain price, the cost doesn’t matter.  We’re reaching the magic point where those two trends cross, as with this OCX Vertex 2 SSD drive, 60G in size and only $120 at Newegg.  There’s lots of post-Christmas sales going on.
  • How soon will SSD drives become normal and platter drives the anachronism, like single-core processors are today?  It took less than 5 years for CPUs, I think…  No link for this idea; this is just me theorizing.
  • Tomas Bodzar pointed out this article about 1,000 core CPUs, which I dub ‘kilocore’.  He also linked to these logical domain/logical partition articles on Wikipedia.
  • In this day and age, a website that supports a limited number of browsers and platforms seems anachronistic.  Still happens, though.  (via)
  • This is neat: an online, persistent space game with exploration and combat.  Not EVE, but Lacuna Expanse, playable via web browser.  There’s lots of browser games out there, but here’s the interesting part: the game even has a fully exposed API.

Lazy reading: numbers, servers, things

So, informal poll time: do people like these Lazy Reading roundups?

  • Numbers everyone should know.  (via)  I link to this cause it’s interesting, and because it shows something else.  If you understand what these numbers mean, congratulations.  You speak a language that a limited number of people on this planet can understand.  Think about that for a bit.
  • The end of a faithful server.  (via)  I can sympathize.  Run any computer for some number of years without any issues, and you’ll miss it when it’s gone.
  • A simple explanation for ‘git reset –hard’.  Some chunks of git are magical, in that I know they work but the internal behavior is still opaque to me.  It may be best to keep it that way.
  • I do gain a perverse sense of pride that DragonFly is an all-volunteer organization.  Linux, on the other hand, is mostly a corporate product.  (via)  I realize this is not a legitimate thing, and I’d love having enough of a market that someone could be paid to work on DragonFly.
  • Hey, the Economist Magazine’s Babbage blog is pretty good.  I like this recent article about the Eye-Fi, a device I tell people about whenever I can.  It essentially erases the need for storage on your camera.  The last paragraph in the Babbage entry is also a little bit important.

Lazy Reading: Clouds, cookies, bugs, more

A catch-up week.

  • Ivan Voras askes for the ‘anti-cloud‘, a true decentralization of resources instead of the cloud-as-a-central-service-from-one-company, which is what it’s becoming now.
  • How not to design a protocol, about HTTP cookies.   (via)  I’ve heard from far more people worried about cookies and the need to clear or block them, than, say, people who realize the risks that programs like Firesheep expose.  Such is life.
  • Will be needed: a SSH VPN.  (via)  Did I link this already?
  • ‘radek’ sends along news of Giant DragonFlies.  Not the most scientific of articles, but a fun thought.
  • sshd, given actual form.
  • Dru Lavigne’s got a nice summary of MeetBSD, complete with pictures, audio, and video.  More conferences should be covered this completely, and quickly.

Lazy Reading: Cute films, app stores, boom boxes

Whoops!  This should have gone up last night.  I’m almost waxing nostalgic for this one.

  • Two words you never thought you’d see together: “heartwarming” and “single system image computing”.  I think this is how we should document everything for DragonFly.  (via)
  • Apple’s bringing the App Store to the Mac platform, which shouldn’t surprise anyone.  Ani Dash has a writeup of the various “app store” platforms out there.  pkgsrc (and FreeBSD/OpenBSD ports) would certainly count.  Surprisingly, the application count for pkgsrc exceeds most of the other stores he lists.
  • Aw, no more cassette Walkmans. (via)  Nowadays, it’s difficult to not take music with you wherever you go.   In the 1980s, there was no other way to bring your music with you, except maybe a lot of batteries and this.  I loved my crappy JVC dual tape deck.

Not quite the same model, but still crap

I am totally stealing the horizonal evocative image idea from things magazine.

Lazy Reading: puzzles, git, old things

Something for everyone this week.

Lazy Reading:books, talks, games, games

    This Lazy Reading post actually has some good lengthy reading in it.

    • Modern Perl: The Book: (actually a pre-print draft)  Even if you don’t know Perl, I’ve always liked the way the author, chromatic, writes.  Many articles about a language or other technical subject tend to either wander about loosely or become a ‘shopping list’ of actions, but chromatic’s work retains focus.
    • Robert Watson presents Capsicum; a recent USENIX talk on Youtube. (via a number of places)
    • 12 Forgotten Games – the slideshow is of most interest.  (via)  Online games that predate the vast swarm of today’s titles.  MUDs, MUSHs, roguelikes, etc.  The nice thing about the slideshow is the link on each slide to a still-running, still-accessible online version of that game.
    • Kieron Gillen‘s moving away from Rock, Paper, Shotgun, a gaming review site that has some honest to goodness decent writing.  (My Lazy Reading posts are similar to their Sunday Papers for a reason.)  One of his articles was all about ZangbandTK.  I was all set to link to that in pkgsrc, but it’s not there – just games/angband-tty and games/angband-x11.  Darnit.  Anyway, read his article and then go play something roguelike.

    Lazy reading: toeplitz, forking, curating, Nethack

    I totally meant to post this yesterday.  Oops!

    Lazy reading: the return of ACID, SSI, weirdness

      A smaller set of links, but still the same volume of reading material.

      Periodical frenzy!

      There’s several publications with new issues out.  It’s a long weekend (in the U.S.) so you can catch up on the reading/listening:

      BSD Magazine has a new issue out, on OpenBSD.  There’s also the happy news that they’ve managed to more than double their circulation.

      The July issue of the Open Source Business Resouce is out, with the theme “Go To Market”.   Next month is “Interdisciplinary Lessons”, and submissions are due in the next two weeks.

      BSDTalk 192 is out with an interview of Colin Percival, the FreeBSD Security Officer.  It’s another interview from BSDCan 2010.  Colin Percival is also responsible for, among other things, tarsnap.com, which I find interesting because of its clear and modern business model.

      Messylaneous: Reviews, packaging, installers, etc

      Link catchup!

      Things to eat up your day

      It’s a holiday weekend, at least in the United States, so I’m posting few things that take time to view.

      Murray Stokely mentioned this in a comment, but it’s juicy enough to warrant a post: the BSD Conferences channel on YouTube has all 17 of the recent AsiaBSDCon 2010 presentations, plus a lot more from other conferences.

      Phil Foglio, the fellow who drew the original BSD Daemon, has several comics strips, all of which are available for free – Buck Godot (complete), MythAdventures (in progress), What’s New with Phil and Dixie (in progress), and Girl Genius (in progress and in print).

      Messylaneous for 2010/05/27: destroying flash, Unix, programming

      I had a sudden buildup of things to link to.  It’s three items, but there’s enough info here to eat a few hours…

      Things that are done

      There’s a number of things that all came together in the last 24 hours or so, which means: bullet points!

      • Jen Lentfer took my suggestion and ran with it.  He’s got an update to Sendmail 8.14.4 on the way too.
      • Binary pkgsrc-2009Q4 packages for DragonFly 2.4.x/i386 are all uploaded.
      • I finished a build of pkgsrc-2009Q4 for DragonFly 2.5.x/x86_64 – take a look and fix some of the broken items, if that interests you.
      • Weekend reading: check out this Trivium post as there’s some interesting historical items.  I may try that LackRack idea in a environment that doesn’t fit a normal rack well…