Category: Someday you will need this

SMBIOS access now possible


Sascha Wildner has added system management BIOS (SMBIOS) support, visible with kenv, from FreeBSD.  Use it for getting things like the BIOS revision, system manufacturer, and so on.  For example:

smbios.bios.reldate="12/04/2006"
smbios.bios.vendor="Dell Inc. "
smbios.bios.version="2.1.0 "

This may seem minor, but this can be very helpful when dealing with hardware you aren’t physically able to access.

Lazy Reading for 2012/11/11


The 3.2 release seems to have gone well.  Who has tried the new USB support?  I’m curious to see how it’s going.

Your unrelated link of the week: This roundup of ultrarealist human sculpture.  You’ve probably seen Ron Mueck‘s art before, at least.

Remember: bin-install


A thread on pkgsrc-users@ reminds me: adding a specific line for bin-install will save time when rebuilding packages; pkgsrc will use existing binary packages instead of rebuilding from source when possible, when this is set.  At least, I’m pretty sure that’s what it does.

Lazy Reading for 2012/09/09


Whee!

  • deadweight, “Find unused CSS selectors by scraping your HTML”.  I’ve needed something like this for years.  (via)
  • The same sort of thing for pkgsrc: pkg_leaves.  Worth running at least yearly, or at least before any significant pkgsrc upgrade.  There’s no point in updating a package you don’t use or need.
  • GNU Coreutils cheat sheet, plus the instructions to make it.  There’s other cheatsheets linked in the article that may be useful.
  • Compiler benchmarks, comparing gcc and clang versions.  For a complete benchmark, I’d want to compare what number of programs build with each, too.  (via ftigeot on #dragonflybsd)
  • When ‘your mom’ and Unix jokes collide.
  • Distraction-free writing with Vim.  (via)
  • Also, there’s a “Modern Vim” book on the way.  Will it be good?  I have no idea; I don’t know of any prior books by the author or who the publisher is.  Those facts might help.
  • For a known author and publisher, here’s a status report on Absolute OpenBSD, 2nd Edition.  If you don’t know what a BOFH is from his last sentence, read the original stories.
  • Quadrilateral Cowboy, a cyberpunk hacking game that actually involves non-boring programming and not just a pipe-matching game under the guise of hacking.
  • While I’m linking to games, GUTS, sorta like Diablo but more… roguey?  It’s turn-based.  Also, an excuse to use the roguelike tag.
  • 4 UNIX commands I abuse every day.  Having done a fair amount of Perl programming, I am entertained by having side effects being the intended goal.  Also, the author pays attention to what runs on BSD.  (via)
  • Disks lie. And the controllers that run them are partners in crime.”  Marshall Kirk McKusick describes just how hard it is to know when your data has really made it from memory to disk.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week.  Dubgif.  Random animated gifs and dubstep clips.  Sometimes it doesn’t work, and sometimes it’s perfect.  (via)  If that’s too random, there’s also this .

Lazy Reading for 2012/06/17


I have such a surplus of links these days that I started this Lazy Reading two weeks ago.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Elfquest, every issue ever.  The dialogue is cheesy but the original art is fun, in a way that grabbed me when I read it at 10 years of age.

Secure your MySQL setup


This was going to go into a Lazy Reading post, but then I realized it shouldn’t.  Here’s the source: “A Tragically Comedic Security Flaw in MySQL” (via)

The short version: MySQL, compiled a certain way, will allow 1 out of 256 root login attempts to work no matter what.  I was going to link to this for the startlingly large number of MySQL installations found allowing connections from the public Internet, which means breaking into any affected servers would be easy.  Then I thought about it…  I don’t see a my.cnf installed by pkgsrc for at least MySQL 5.1 by default.

To fix this for your own installation, put

[mysqld]
bind-address=127.0.0.1

in /usr/pkg/etc/my.cnf to disallow remote connections.  I don’t know if MySQL on DragonFly from pkgsrc is vulnerable to the issue, but it’s a good idea to not allow remote connections to the database, and ought to be on by default.

Or just use Postgres, if possible.

 

Lazy Reading for 2012/06/10


I got to use the ‘roguelike’ tag again this week, which always makes me happy.  Surprisingly, it’s not about… that roguelike.

Your unrelated link of the week: I happen to work at a salt mining operation, which leads to some unique problems (more).  Mining in the US is regulated by MSHA, which has been cracking down since the Upper Big Branch incident. MSHA issues  ‘fatalgrams‘ every time a miner dies.  MSHA also shows up on site as soon as possible, which means they are there taking pictures within a few minutes, with equipment still running.  It’s essentially crime scene photos, and a little worrying; many of the deaths are of people around my age with similar experience.

Lazy Reading for 2012/06/03


So many links this week I’m already working on next week’s entry.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated comic link of the week: Make Good Art.  (via)  The comic version of Neil Gaiman’s recent commencement speech, cause comics are more fun than video.

How to upgrade pkgsrc packages


DragonFly has a page on updating pkgsrc, and so does NetBSD.  I don’t think I linked to the latter before, but even if I didn’t, it’s still useful.

Debugging RANCID


Michael Lucas has a writeup on how he debugged his RANCID setup.  I link to it for the technical details, and also because if you have to manage more than a few switches or other network devices, RANCID is very useful.

Posted by     Categories: Goings-on, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/04/22


Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week: One Thing Well.  The BSD tag might be the most useful.

OpenJDK7 building


Based on a recent post from Chris Turner to the tech-pkg@netbsd.org mailing list, here’s a bug report that should get you to a working lang/OpenJDK7 pkgsrc package.

Lazy Reading for 2012/04/08


The links are all over the map this week, which is fine.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week: memepool.  It’s seen some activity lately.  It was a blog before there were blogs, and I was part of it.

Fixing X video performance


I’ve seen a few people complain about poor video performance in DragonFly, in Xorg.  If you see a bunch of  “contigmalloc_map: failed …” errors in your dmesg, your video card needs more contiguous memory allocated.  Set vm.dma_reserved to 32M in /boot/loader.conf and you should be set.  If that doesn’t work, try 64M.

Apache in jail: a tip


Konrad Neuwirth is running Apache inside a jail, and getting some weird errors.  Obviously I don’t know the fix, but Chris Turner knows what the settings need to be.

How to idle on #dragonfly


A tip for anyone who hasn’t tried this yet: run irssi in screen, and connect to #dragonflybsd on EFNet.  You can then resume your screen session at any time after disconnecting and see the backlog, catch people addressing you directly, etc.

Before anyone says it: yes, I know, tmux works too.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/03/18


I’m making sure I post this Lazy Reading on the right day.  A nice full week’s worth of stuff.

Your unrelated link of the week: Neo Scavenger.  (via)  It’s a game, in Flash, and in beta.  If you like  postapocalyptic survival, it may be for you.

Running something once


Have you ever tried to run a service and realized you forgot to make an entry in rc.conf to enable it?  It’s mildly annoying.  There’s now a “one’ keyword (via NetBSD) that lets you enable a service, once.  It still apparently performs sanity checks, unlike the otherwise-similar ‘force’ keyword.

Remote Web Browsing via OpenSSH and PuTTY


That’s exactly what Michael Lucas talks about in this recent post; using ssh to browse from a different machine, but using a local web browser.  He uses it to get around a network problem, but I imagine there’s a number of other applications.  This is one of the valuable tips from his recent book.

Posted by     Categories: Goings-on, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/02/26


Hello new DragonFly 3.0 users!  This is my not-about-DragonFly weekend link roundup.  I’ll be back to regular DragonFly-ish stuff tomorrow.

  • Vim anti-patterns, Gnuplotting, and Computing History At Bell Labs.  I’m combining what would normally be 3 separate points because I stole them all from Christian Neukirchen’s blog.  I wish I had found them first.
  • I mentioned Dungeons & Dragons last week, which led Michael Lucas to point out Dungeon Crawl Classics in the comments.   Along that same theme, here’s some 70’s role playing game illustrations.  (via)  There’s a parallel between computing in the late 1970s and fantasy; expert programmers were called wizards, understanding computers was an esoteric art…  I could develop the heck out of that thesis, but let’s just look at the pictures and feel nostalgic instead.
  • And then everything got a lot more weird-looking, 20 years later!  (via)
  • Hey, that time zone lawsuit mentioned here before was dismissed.  That’s good news.  (via lots of places)
  • Hyperpolyglot: Scripting.  Look for your favorite scripting language and compare it side-by-side with others. (via ferz on EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • The text of the DragonFly 3.0 announcement gets copied around to a lot of sites, far more than I’m linking here.  However, I found this one entertaining because it kind of makes it sound like DragonFly is just what I happened to come with.
  • Custom 3D printing is becoming accessible enough that I’m trying to think of things I could get printed that way, even though I don’t need it.  (via I lost it, sorry)

Your unrelated link of the week: Quigley’s Cabinet.  Read her books if you have a fascination with old dead things.

Posted by     Categories: Someday you will need this, UNIXish     0 Comments

WHMCS installation notes


Michael Lucas installed WHMCS, a commerical hosting management tool, on FreeBSD.  He tells a story of doing so, and in the process happened to list all the PHP modules needed for it to run.  I’m linking it because that list is going to come in useful for someone, someday.

BSD, BIND, and DNSSEC


If you were thinking about implementing DNSSEC, Michael Lucas did it himself and wrote down his notes.  You can read them and either follow along to implement it yourself, or just spectate.  The one disadvantage is that it uses BIND 9.9, and I only see 9.8 and 10 in pkgsrc.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Goings-on, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Odd DVD drive issue


Edward Berger found that using a LG/Hitachi DVD drive kept him from successfully booting a DragonFly install CD.  Using other manufacturers worked out fine.  What causes the problem?  I don’t know, but it’s worth mentioning it out loud in case someone else gets bit by it.

Updating Samba to 3.6


I’m posting this because it will save someone (possibly me) an hour of aggravation someday.  If you are updating Samba from version 3.0 or 3.3 to a later version, it’ll take your existing config but possibly silently break on user authentication.

Posted by     Categories: pkgsrc, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Getting rid of lpr


If you install CUPS, or know that you will never print using lpr(1), you can make sure thatyour DragonFly system never builds lpr again by putting NO_LPR=true in /etc/make.conf.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Setting up a DragonFly wireless access point


What if you have a DragonFly system that you want to use for an wireless access point?  Andrey N. Oktyabrski did, and he helpfully listed his solution.

How to get DNSSEC going


I just mentioned DNSSEC in last week’s Lazy Reading, and here’s a “How to get DNSSEC with BIND 9.8.1 working” article from Michael Lucas.  It’s pretty simple…  Conveniently, BIND 9.8.1 is available in pkgsrc as net/bind98.

How much RAM is too little?


If you’re running DragonFly on a very low-end system, you may be wondering about memory requirements for Hammer.  Hammer is much less RAM-hungry than ZFS, so it looks like you can get away with 128M, as long as you don’t mind the occasional error message.  You can manually tweak settings for it if you like.  256M is plenty.

It still strikes me as odd to consider systems with less than 1G of RAM as “low-memory”.  What rich times we live in!

Keeping binutils out of the build


There is now a NO_BINUTILS221 option, added by Sascha Wildner, that will keep your system from building binutils 2.21 during a buildworld.  The system will still build binutils 2.22, so there will still be a functioning ld on the system.  Use this along with NO_GCC41 (so only gcc 4.4 gets built) to speed up your buildworlds, if you like.

Loader changes for IPMI


If you’re looking to use IPMI and remotely watch the console of another system, Matthew Dillon has made some changes to help with that.

Coccinelle usage examples and DragonFly


Sascha Wildner has been using a new-to-me tool called coccinelle (no, not that) to scan for a number of problemsPatches for this tool may be useful for anyone else using coccinelle for bug-finding in other software.

Moving files with a virtualized DragonFly


If you’re running DragonFly in a virtual machine – specifically in VirtualBox, on Windows – there’s a recent thread on users@ that may have some tips, including a link from John Marino to tunnelier.

Lazy Reading for 2011/10/09


Getting close to 2.12 release…

Lazy Reading for 2011/10/02


Yep, fall hits and it’s easier to find links.

Your unrelated link of the week: Scientific Illustration.  Not a comic, but still visually interesting.

Debugging with pkgsrc


At some point, you may want to generate binary programs that are unstripped of debugging information.  You may want to generate them with pkgsrc.  Here’s a little note on what options will make that happen.

Lazy Reading for 2011/09/04


It’s almost the end of summer here, or at least the traditional end of summer in North America.  About time, too!  I don’t like the heat.  Anyway, as people trickle back to school, some more interesting doodads should show up for these weekly Lazy Reading posts…

Your unrelated comic link of the week: Jack Kirby art on what would have been his 94th birthday.  I have trouble communicating how dramatic and influential his art has been.

PPTP, explained


As part of a larger thread, Chris Turner went into a longer explanation of how PPTP connections work.  Do you have PPTP working on DragonFly?  Please share details!

Secret committer hints


If you’re committing something to DragonFly, or even just working on your own Git repository so as to submit a patch, the new-to-me-and-not-actually-secret committer(7) man page has a lot of tips.  I’m linking to it because it holds a lot of information that otherwise would be something you’d have to soak up over time from the community, maybe.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

DragonFly and IPv6 advertisements


Apparently, if you are running IPv6, and using radvd (Linux)/rtadvd (BSD) to autoconfigure your hosts with IPv6 addresses, you need to tell your DragonFly hosts to accept this.

Lazy Reading for 2011/07/24


Lazy reading is easy when it’s been this hot out.  In fact, I may melt before this article gets published.

  • Ecdysis – a NAT64 gateway program.  I link to it for two reasons.  1: You will probably need to NAT 6-to-4 sooner or later, and 2: it uses PF and so is BSD-compatible. (via)
  • Don’t not copy that floppy! (also via)  My original Apple ][ disk for Castle Wolfenstein is probably no longer functional.  Not that I have equipment to play it on…
  • World timezones, as a visible map.  (via)   I mention time zone updates here on occasion, and this is a immediate guide to what a strange patchwork of zones it is.  You can’t even see some of the really tiny/crazy ones.
  • A crappy way to start your day.  Nobody ever enjoys that call from work…

And now, a link that has nothing to do with this.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Goings-on, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Practical Packet Analysis: a review


Background: You may remember some time ago, I posted a review of Michael Lucas’s Network Flow Analysis.  He’s written several BSD books and so I figured it was worth reading further, knowing that this network-specific book would be BSD-friendly.  Also, he made it easier by sending me a copy.

No Starch Press, the company that published all the books linked in the previous paragraph, asked if I’d read/review another book from them. This would be Practical Packet Analysis, 2nd edition.  (Review continues after the break…)

More…

Man pages through DuckDuckGo


I happened to stumble on this: the DuckDuckGo search engine will take you directly to a DragonFly man page, if you type ‘!dfman’ at the start of your query.  For instance, “!dfman hammer“.

Remember to enable deduplication


I didn’t think of this, but I needed it: if you have an older Hammer system that now can perform deduplication because you upgraded to DragonFly 2.10, make sure to add it to the configuration for that file system, or else it won’t run.

Lazy Reading


You can probably infer the new (to me) blog I found this week from some of the links…

  • Adding IPv6 to a FreeBSD Mail/Web Server – from Michael Lucas, repeat BSD author.  I link to this because we’re all going to have to do something similar in the next year or so, I bet..
  • A visual guide to TMUX, part 1 and part 2.  tmux has usually been introduced to me as “It’s BSD-licensed and not screen”, which is good, but not compelling on its own.  The first of the articles linked here goes over the comparative differences in some detail.  (via)
  • Speaking of screen-ish things, do you leave an irssi session running in screen so that you can rejoin IRC conversations at any time?  I sure do.  Sometimes I even reconnect through ConnectBot on my Android phone.  There’s now a Connectbot variation for irssi, just for people who do such a thing.  Don’t forget: #dragonflybsd on EFNet.
  • Also still on the topic: forgetting to use screen and then being stuck with a long-running process is lousy.  There’s ways to deal with it, though.  (via, from a blogroll link)
  • Hey, it’s neat to see a new business built on BSD – OpenBSD, in this case: Tunnelr.  (via)
  • We’re still doing great in terms of pkgsrc packages building successfully on DragonFly.
  • An hour+ recording of the recent NYCBUG meeting about BSD networking is online.  (Link is to a MP3 – via)
  • How not to comment code.
  • AT&T -> BSD -> AT&T.

cryptdisk and keymaps


This is one of those scenarios that I’m noting because it might bite someone, some day: if your root partition is encrypted, you can’t fit in a different keymap.  However, kernel options to build in a different keymap will fix this issue.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Lazy Reading: cheatsheet, disks, pkgsrc, more


Normally I hold this for Sunday, but I’ve got a good batch of links already.  Something here for everyone, this week.

  • A git cheatsheet, and another git cheatsheet.  I may have linked to the latter one before, as it looks vaguely familiar.  Anyway, bookmark.  (Thanks, luxh on EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • What should you do about bad blocks on a disk?  Get a new disk.
  • If you ever wanted to port software, there’s a pkgsrc developer’s guide (thanks Francois Tigeot) that shows you how.
  • It’s NOT LINUX, for the billionth time.  It’s BSD UNIX (certified, even) under there!
  • Children of the Cron“.  An entertaining pun.  (via)
  • Nothing to do with BSD, or even computers, really: Gary Gorton, interviewed about the recent financial crisis, at a Fed bank website (!?).  Interesting because I like economic matters, and because it’s the first web page where I’ve ever seen pop-up links added usefully, as a sort of footnote that you don’t have to scroll.  (via)
  • Michael Lucas recently had a machine broken into.  Since everything on the machine is suspect, he’s using Netflow data to figure out when it happened, and how, which is not surprising given his most recent book.  He has two posts describing how he backtracks his way to the probable source.

LOCALPATCHES a possibility


I never really noticed this before, but it’s possible to include your own patchsets into pkgsrc and have them picked up as part of the build process, using $LOCALPATCHES.

Less is more, really


If you were dying to have less behave like more, it’s possible to do so with these tips from Oliver Fromme.  I don’t know if it’s that desirable, but it’s an interesting thing.

Lazy Reading: Lots and lots of it


Somehow I ended up with a zillion links for this week’s Lazy Reading.  I hope you’ve got some spare time for this…  Let’s get right into it:

  • Michael Lucas, BSD book author (see links on site), has started Twittering.   He’s also found the Wikileaks/NetBSD association that I didn’t know about, as Julian Assange even shows up in the NetBSD fortunes file.  Also, while linking to his blog, I’ll point at his post on “Write what you don’t know“.  Think of that article next time you feel you don’t know enough to contribute to something – especially open source.
  • There’s a lengthy dialog on the tech-pkg@netbsd.org mailing list about pkgsrc, and “Making it easier to get and use pkgsrc“.   You can follow the whole thread on the listing page.  I am all for the idea.  Everybody and their brother has an App Store these days.  Ports/pkgsrc are perhaps the original app store ideas, and I’d like to see them brought to the same level as these commercial entitites.  This is important: pkgsrc is perhaps the only app store equivalent in existence that is not tied to a platform; that exists only to get you software rather than to provide a way to tie a platform into its developers profits.
  • Hey, a roguelike zombie apocalypse game!  Aw, it’s Windows-only.
  • Mikel King has an editorial that sums up the many places BSD serves as an underpinning to products – a good checklist, if you don’t know of them.  He’s also written an instructional article on passwordless/SSH setup.
  • Along the same lines, Promote Perl by Building Great Things.  This applies to BSD products too; telling people it’s great doesn’t work as well as making something great and showing that a BSD system is part of what makes it so.
  • Did you know there are even BSD Certification classes in Iran?  I really need to do that… though probably not at that location.
  • Yacc is not dead.  (via)  I link to this because I had a moment of nerd excitement realizing that blog’s title is intended to look like a bang path.
  • Database design ideas.  There’s been a good series of posts there lately, good for anyone wanting to move beyond the basic CRUD details.

A super-simple install


I was reading this Perl Advent Calendar (that would be good for DragonFly, come to think of it) post about ack, and came across a interesting line:

curl http://betterthangrep.com/ack-standalone > ~/bin/ack && chmod 0755 !#:3'

fetch’ would work just as well on a BSD system. The interesting thing is that it’s a one-liner for installing software that doesn’t make any assumptions about having an existing framework like pkgsrc or aptitude or anything like that – it just grabs the code and plops it in place.  It wouldn’t work for more complex software, but the simplicity is intriguing, to match the Unix-like single, chainable program idea.

For those who haven’t seen it, ‘ack‘ is a grep replacement that automatically takes care of common activities around searching – skipping files that would cause duplicate matches, binary files, etc., handles a larger range of regular expressions, and runs startlingly fast.

Odd mouse fix


Siju George noticed that his mouse would stop working in X, perhaps every hour.  Restarting X would fix it, but he didn’t have a clear cause.  Antonio Huete Jimenez suggested turning the sysctl ‘debug.psm.loglevel’ to 9 to at least see what messages cropped up, and that seemed to fix it.  I don’t think it’s a good long-term solution, but it’s worth mentioning in case this odd bug bites someone else.

A Dell laptop fix


Naoya Sugioka had trouble booting DragonFly on his Dell M4400.  He updated ACPICA with this patch, and was able to boot.  I link to it in case someone else with a recent Dell model (or perhaps just a laptop with the same chipset?) has the same issues.

A fix for docbook and pkgsrc issues


A number of people have encountered this: while installing some larger pkgsrc package, the process stops on a strange DocBook error.  Alex Hornung has a fix:  symlink /usr/pkg/etc/xml/catalog to /usr/pkg/share/xml/catalog.

Power levels and how to vary them


Alex Hornung is having trouble getting his power consumption as low as it could be on his DragonFly laptop.  A side effect of this problem is that when he posts about it, he also manages to enumerate all the various ways you can reduce power consumption and heat usage on a laptop.  (Follow the thread for more.)

APIC_IO changes warning


If your system has trouble when APIC_IO is enabled, and you’re tracking DragonFly 2.9, you may have trouble on your next build.  The fix is putting this in your loader.conf:

hw.apic_io_enable=0

I know this has already been covered, to some extent, but one can never be too clear with solutions.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

ACPI and all its parts


YONETANI Tomokazu wrote out a nice explanation of acpi(4) and the myriad ACPI subsystems which can be enabled or disabled at boot time.  If you do have booting problems, it’s usually ACPI, and it’s usually only one small part.  Finding that small part is easier with this list.

Slightly less hassle for Linux support


Something that always got with with Linux binary support was that I couldn’t get the Linux /proc filesystem to automatically mount on boot.  I’d end up doing it by hand later, right after I tried to start a Linux binary and had all sorts of issues.  Pierre Abbat had this same problem, and Sascha Wildner has the answer: “linux_load=yes” in /boot/loader.conf.

Another reminder: update configure files


When compiling software on DragonFly but outside of pkgsrc, and you have trouble with configure, remember you can always manually pull down new versions.  You’re welcome, future me.

Installing a vkernel


I’m linking to this commit message from Matthias Schmidt simply because it has the correct invocation for installing a vkernel, and I know this will come in handy, someday.

A reference for pkgsrc make, again


There’s a whole lot of options for bmake, used in pkgsrc, and they aren’t immediately obvious.  I’ve linked to a reference before, but it’s no longer at that location.  However, I found a new link!

Messylaneous: books, conventions, videos, conventions


Link dumps just so I can get caught up.

Reminder: use serno


Using ‘serno’, meaning specifying disks by serial number rather than path, is a good idea.  If you have a machine that started out as an older DragonFly installation, it may be a good idea to use this feature.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

Messylaneous: reading, catchup


I apologize; I’ve been missing.  Here’s some misc links while I get back in gear:

  • A very good reason to be interested in Hammer over ZFS: nobody will threaten lawsuits over Hammer.
  • 10 tricks for admins.  I’m posting it cause I can never remember that thing with tunneling ssh out.  (via)
  • This Gaming Life, as a free download.  An excellent book that is in physical form on my shelf right now.  Yes, unrelated.

A trick for updating moved packages


Sometimes, packages are renamed in pkgsrc, usually because of a version change.  If that happens, it can be hard to find the replacement.  You can manually add them, or there’s a trick to make the build ‘jump’ to the new name.