No atime in Hammer

Hammer now defaults to ‘noatime’, meaning the date and time of last access are not updated on every file action.  Note that creation and modification date and time are still recorded.  This will help with speed and disk activity.

This may cause a problem with any software expecting this to change – mutt, possibly?  We will find out.  This change was done after the 4.4 branch, so it’s not in the current release of DragonFly.

HAMMER2 root mounts and live dedup too

HAMMER2 recently gained the ability to be used as the root mount for your DragonFly system.  Live deduplication of data is also now possible, which means fast copy operations, less space used, and no need to wait for an overnight batch process to do it.  If you want to try it, you need a bleeding edge DragonFly system and the WANT_HAMMER2 option.  It’s still not ready for production use, so don’t try it with any data you want to keep.

Many Hammer 1 updates, and credit

I don’t note it enough, but Tomohiro Kusumi has been making constant updates to HAMMER, the version we have now.  Often they are the sort of update that makes the code more readable, or fixes possible problems, and so on.  Very essential, but hard to post about it.  In any case, I’m using his recent improvements to hammer volume-del to note his contributions, of which there are much more than the day’s worth I link here.

Hammer and Hammer2 details

I haven’t been drawing enough attention to it, but there’s been a bunch of HAMMER filesystem activity lately: First, Tomohiro Kusumi has been working on HAMMER – these posts are a small subset of his commits.  Second, Matthew Dillon has been working full steam ahead on HAMMER2.  The HAMMER2 design document has been updated (read this!), and he’s already accomplished master->slave disk syncing.

It’s not ready for production, of course, which you may already realize, so don’t install it unless you want to work on the code.

Slider, for Hammer

John Marino has created something very useful: a graphical tool for Hammer file history.  It’s called ‘Slider’, and it uses curses to work in a terminal.  It shows historic versions of files and can restore those old versions as needed.  This was already possible in Hammer, of course, but it required a sequence of commands that were not straight-forward.  I’ve been slow enough posting it that version 2.0 is already out, offering a way to see files that no longer exist, but are still in history.  (i.e. deleted some time ago)  ‘Time Machine’ sounds like the best name, but that seems to be taken.